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KNOWING vs. BELIEVING

A conversation is recounted in the book # Shantaram  in which the character, Khaderbhai, says: “There is no such thing as believing in #G...

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Thursday, 30 May 2013

HOW DO I ASK FOR MONEY? or VALUING MY SELF, Part 3

I spoke in my last two blogs about the need to unhitch self-worth from market-worth in order to get comfortable about money matters and, in particular, in order not to under-value yourself.  How to do that?

The first, easy part, is to assess your market-worth.  This is an objective number which can be bench-marked against a basket of measures.  It is an objective exercise because money has no subjectivity about it.  Money is just a means of exchange, devoid of feelings and worthiness.  In fact, money in its own right has no value.  A banknote is just a piece of paper with a number written on it. It is only our crazy minds that have attributed a value to the number and hence a value to the note.  Even more interesting is that US$100 has a very different perceived value for someone like Bill Gates than it does for a homeless person.  Nonetheless, it remains for the world an objective measure of value i.e. what one is willing to pay for something else.

You have certain skills / gifts / experience / services / intellectual property / widgets / qualifications, all of which can command a certain price in a market economy.  Your only challenge is to determine that price objectively.  The price, or value of your services has nothing to do with what you think about yourself.  The price, or value, must be benchmarked against similar services in the market.  

NEXT TIME:  ASSESSING YOUR MARKET WORTH, continued.



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